The Money is in the Presentation

Have you ever been walking around at the local fair, and you are stopped dead in your tracks by an attractive man, or woman, talking on a microphone. You notice that beside them there is a table full of products. Let’s say that this one is advertising knives that can cut through anything. You have to watch just to see what is going on. Then the presentation begins, the knives really do cut through everything, and she proves it by chopping through steal pipes. Now you realize that you just cannot live without those knives. The seller has done their job, they have set up the presentation and you bought it hook line and sinker.

Do you have a product that you make to sell? If you do, you know how tricky it can be to create enough excitement about the product to sell it so that you can make money. You could learn a lot from this presentation, clearly it works, you are now the proud owner of fifty dollar’s worth of knives that you did not need. By looking around you will be able to see that you are not the only one.

Contact your local visitors office, ask them what kind of events that your community has, that would work for you to set up a presentation at. Be professional, and talk about the project as if live isn’t livable without it. How good the product sells is now up to you. The more you believe in it, the more other people will think they need it.

Create Emotional Plans Before Negotiating Forcefully

Before you begin to negotiate, create an emotional plan to assist you in progressing towards the goals of the negotiation. In essence, your plan will become your roadmap and the mental makeup you might possess during the negotiation will impact the overall outcome of the negotiation.

The purpose of developing a negotiation plan offers many benefits. When you incorporate the emotional state you might possess during the negotiation, along with that of the person with whom you’re negotiating, you enhance the plan’s viability. A few of the benefits are …

1. A negotiation plan that incorporates the emotional state you might find yourself in during the negotiation helps you stay focused on the overall goals of the negotiation. Assessing and incorporating the emotional state of the other negotiator can uncover potential nuances he might project into the negotiation.

2. If unforeseen occurrences creep into the negotiation, (i.e. loud outburst, sedateness) or something that’s awe-inspiring, an alarm should occur within you, due to the fact that you had not considered that aspect of the negotiation. This in turn should serve as a reminder to call a ‘time out’ (not address the new occurrence until you’ve had adequate time to evaluate its consequences).

3. A plan should allow you to maintain control of your emotions, if you know you’re the type of person that is easily influenced or manipulated by others, or easily persuaded to action by your emotions.

Most people make decisions based on the emotions they possess at the time of their decision. Then, they justify their decision with logic. If logic does not allow them to rationally justify their decision, and the emotion is strong, that person will discount the value of logic and pursue the course they’re on. Too many times after negotiating, people find themselves in a quandary. As the result of not being completely satisfied with the outcome of the negotiation, they beat themselves up and curse the outcome when the emotions that lead to their actions have subsided.

You have to know yourself and take into account the mental perspective you possess and the perspective you’ll have prior to sitting down at the negotiation table. You should also mentally project yourself into the mindset you think you’ll possess during the negotiation; by doing so, it will serve as a dry run and better prepare you for the negotiation (This is an exercise I have each and every client go through prior to any negotiation session they enter into).

In addition to assessing your emotions, you should also give careful thought to the emotions of the person with whom you’ll be negotiating. If you don’t know what the other person’s emotional level, makeup, or dispersion might be, go through several scenarios, so as to ‘estimate’ where their emotions might lie; the purpose for doing so is to create an emotional sparring partner from which you’ll be able to create greater emotional control within yourself during the negotiations.

When you negotiate, don’t search the ether for emotions that should be kept under control. If you maintain control of your emotions throughout the negotiation process, you won’t find yourself being held captive by an unforeseen force that causes you angst about what you really want from the negotiation. By maintaining control of your emotions during the negotiation, you’ll be in control of yourself and increase the chances of a favorable negotiation outcome … and everything will be right with the world.

The Negotiation Lessons are …

· Don’t allow your emotions to lock you into a cement trap from which your negotiation position becomes immobile. Engage in negotiations from a non-emotional perspective and mentally you’ll be more fluid in the options you evaluate during the negotiation.

· When developing a negotiation plan, try to envision what your emotions might consist of throughout the negotiation. If you plan to negotiate forcefully, try to sense and really feel the emotions you might possess. The more you can experience your emotions before sitting at the negotiation table, the more equipped you’ll be at dealing with negative emotions that could distract you during the negotiation.

· From time to time, practice altering your emotional state of mind to seek understanding of what ‘sets you off’. By identifying traits you possess that cause you to become upset or very excited, you’ll gain knowledge of how to control those emotions. Then, during negotiations, you’ll have better control and command of those emotions.

Presentation Skills Training: How To Handle Difficult Questions

What’s the toughest part of business presenting to important clients and prospects? How to handle difficult questions with poise. Curious how the pros make it look so easy and natural? Find out how to handle questions under fire with complete ease.

With more and more subject matter experts presenting directly to clients and prospects, answering questions on the spot is an increasingly important issue. In my presentation skills training, this is consistently the number 1 area of concern.

Why is handling questions such a hot topic?

Many professionals like to reduce risk and control the outcomes of their work environment. When faced with unexpected, uncomfortable or difficult questions, it’s easy to feel on the spot.

Yet, we’ve all seen public speakers and professionals who seem to handle questions with ease and poise. What do they know that we don’t?

If you’re feeling fed up with formulas, tired of feeling bewildered, and ready for a solution to the question problem, read on.

1. Anticipate The Worst
What are the questions you deeply hope no one will ever ask? What are the dark holes in your facts?
What are the difficult parts in your company history?
What are the missing links in your business story?

Anticipate these questions, and it’s easier to work on your responses-before you step in the room.

2. Collaborate and Expand
When looking into all the scary questions, don’t try to come up with all of them in isolation. Ask peers. Ask people from your company who have more experience presenting. Interview colleagues to find out what questions they received in the past.

Look to colleagues outside of your work environment. While the topics differ, difficult questions have a certain commonality. You’ll be better prepared when you get a similar one tossed your way.

3. Brainstorm Solutions
Work with your team to brainstorm answers. Again, if you’re feeling stuck, the fastest way to add fluidity is to brainstorm. Other people on your team will see answers and find solutions with a fresh perspective.

4. Explore More Options
Ask a professional presentation coach to help you add to the questions you’re compiling. They are likely to notice areas that you may be unconsciously avoiding. Your presentation coach also has personal experience in coming up with questions, and responding to difficult questions on the spot.

5. Simplify Your Answers
When you’re preparing your answers to potential questions, keep it simple. This helps in two ways. First, you will remember your answer! Second, your audience will easily follow your response.

6. Practice, Practice, Practice
Practice speaking your answers. Say each one, conversationally. Adjust the words until you are comfortable and confident.

Then, practice, practice and practice some more. Rehearse alone. Practice with a peer. Answer questions, working under rapid fire, with your presentation coach. The more you practice realistic speed and real-world content, the better you’ll feel when your big moment comes.

7. Record and Review
Record your answers in front of a video camera. Yes, it’s kicking the pressure up a notch. Not many people are thrilled with how they look on video.

But the pleasure of feeling confident far outweighs the pain of seeing yourself on camera. Record your response to questions. Then, watch your practice rounds with your presentation coach. Get candid and honest feedback from your coach.

Ask her or him to help you respond more naturally, authentically and professionally. Focus on using your unique strengths to build confidence and poise for challenging question sessions.

Interested in presenting like a pro? By following these 7 simple steps, you’ll transform your skills and handle difficult questions with complete poise.