Using Rapid Prototyping for Rubber Keypad Product Presentations

When creating a new product that contains custom rubber keypads, designers can use a rapid prototype as a representation before the final production. It’s useful in showing people what the product will look like. Although it can’t be used in the field for real-time situations, the detailing is at least 95 percent in comparison to the final version. Rapid prototypes are available in about two to three weeks, which is a faster lead time than most final production times. This allows the designer to use it as a visual tool in presentations, beta testing and for marketing materials. It’s helpful in a variety of industries, including auto parts, space flight components, industrial equipment, electronics, telecommunications and medical devices, to name a few.

Explaining Function
The old adage says that a picture is worth a thousand words. This is especially true when trying to explain how a product works. A rapid prototype can be used with demonstrative slide show presentations to show people what the silicone molded keypad will look like. A number of studies show that an audience will pay more attention to speeches and sales pitches when there are interesting images involved. Photos of the silicone keypad prototype can be included in a slide show or live presentation to keep the audience engaged and help them understand the functions and talking points of the design.

Beta Testing Groups
When showing the silicone keypad prototype to potential users in beta testing groups, the designer can get valuable feedback. This is an opportunity to address questions and concerns about the product while there is still time to make changes in it. Different base colors and keypad printing samples are helpful in fit, form and function analyses. The end user is often able to provide insight that the creator might not think of during the original design process.

Marketing Materials
One of the most important parts of launching new products is marketing. Brochures, commercials and printed images for storyboards are critical in devising a marketing campaign. One drawback is having to wait for the final production to be completed before the marketing campaign can be implemented. A rapid prototype is a suitable solution, acting as a stand-in for photos and commercials. It’s also ideal for trade shows, where potential clients can look at it up close for details and to achieve a better understanding of the concept.

Gaining Investors
It can be difficult to portray an inventor’s vision to a group of potential investors. Showing them what it will look like can be a determining factor in bringing them on board with financing. A silicone keypad prototype shows how big it will be, what color options are available and how the various parts of the product line up together. It makes the vision more tangible.

Presentation Skills Training: How To Handle Difficult Questions

What’s the toughest part of business presenting to important clients and prospects? How to handle difficult questions with poise. Curious how the pros make it look so easy and natural? Find out how to handle questions under fire with complete ease.

With more and more subject matter experts presenting directly to clients and prospects, answering questions on the spot is an increasingly important issue. In my presentation skills training, this is consistently the number 1 area of concern.

Why is handling questions such a hot topic?

Many professionals like to reduce risk and control the outcomes of their work environment. When faced with unexpected, uncomfortable or difficult questions, it’s easy to feel on the spot.

Yet, we’ve all seen public speakers and professionals who seem to handle questions with ease and poise. What do they know that we don’t?

If you’re feeling fed up with formulas, tired of feeling bewildered, and ready for a solution to the question problem, read on.

1. Anticipate The Worst
What are the questions you deeply hope no one will ever ask? What are the dark holes in your facts?
What are the difficult parts in your company history?
What are the missing links in your business story?

Anticipate these questions, and it’s easier to work on your responses-before you step in the room.

2. Collaborate and Expand
When looking into all the scary questions, don’t try to come up with all of them in isolation. Ask peers. Ask people from your company who have more experience presenting. Interview colleagues to find out what questions they received in the past.

Look to colleagues outside of your work environment. While the topics differ, difficult questions have a certain commonality. You’ll be better prepared when you get a similar one tossed your way.

3. Brainstorm Solutions
Work with your team to brainstorm answers. Again, if you’re feeling stuck, the fastest way to add fluidity is to brainstorm. Other people on your team will see answers and find solutions with a fresh perspective.

4. Explore More Options
Ask a professional presentation coach to help you add to the questions you’re compiling. They are likely to notice areas that you may be unconsciously avoiding. Your presentation coach also has personal experience in coming up with questions, and responding to difficult questions on the spot.

5. Simplify Your Answers
When you’re preparing your answers to potential questions, keep it simple. This helps in two ways. First, you will remember your answer! Second, your audience will easily follow your response.

6. Practice, Practice, Practice
Practice speaking your answers. Say each one, conversationally. Adjust the words until you are comfortable and confident.

Then, practice, practice and practice some more. Rehearse alone. Practice with a peer. Answer questions, working under rapid fire, with your presentation coach. The more you practice realistic speed and real-world content, the better you’ll feel when your big moment comes.

7. Record and Review
Record your answers in front of a video camera. Yes, it’s kicking the pressure up a notch. Not many people are thrilled with how they look on video.

But the pleasure of feeling confident far outweighs the pain of seeing yourself on camera. Record your response to questions. Then, watch your practice rounds with your presentation coach. Get candid and honest feedback from your coach.

Ask her or him to help you respond more naturally, authentically and professionally. Focus on using your unique strengths to build confidence and poise for challenging question sessions.

Interested in presenting like a pro? By following these 7 simple steps, you’ll transform your skills and handle difficult questions with complete poise.

What Makes a Good MLM Presentation Part 2 of 3

This is Part 2 of a 3-part article which I’ll discuss what makes a good MLM presentation:

Part #1 – Your state of mind

Part #2 – The problem and solution approach

Part #3 – What is your offer to your prospects?

Let’s get started…

Do you like sales people?

I guess your answer is most likely like mine – NO.

When you smell a saleman from miles away, you would probably change plan and go in the opposite direction.

So, what is it that we don’t like about sales people?

Probably we don’t like people who are pushy, biased and tell us what’s good for us. We would rather prefer to make

our own buying decision and to buy what we think is good for us.

You see, when you make an MLM presentation to someone, the last thing you want is to appear as a sales person, armed with a folder in hand, flipping through slide after slide, hoping to make a sale. In fact, I know of people who joined the MLM industry because they just want to stop their sponsor from pestering them.

In that case, how should we present ourselves when we make an MLM presentation to our prospects?

Here’s my 2-step approach that I use personally that had proved to be successful most of the time:

- Identify their problems

- Offer them your solution

Step #1 – Identify their problems or desires

This might sound like common sense but many times we may not even realize it when we go around offering solutions to people before finding out their problems.

Isn’t that what spammers do? All you need to do is to open up your inbox and look at the emails and you would know what I mean. Everyday, we get an enormous amount of junk mail from people who are pushing solutions to us.

So, the first thing to do is to find out what the prospects are going through if you’re making an MLM presentation either one on one or to a small group. (If you’re making a presentation to a large audience, obviously this is not practicable and what you can do is to point out some common problems especially financial challenges that people face in their lives.

And how do you find identify their problems or desires?

First, during the initial warm up, you should attempt to connect with your prospects by building rapport so that they feel comfortable with you. And the best way to do that is to ask questions to lead them to tell more about their financial challenges they face. Frankly, this is more of an art than a science as we are dealing with unique individuals.

Second, you need to listen actively when they start talking. That means, you have to respond with either short verbal feedback like short questions or with body language like nodding to reconfirm what they are telling you.

By asking and listening actively, you would be able to identify their problems, typically financial challenges that they are facing. In some cases, your prospects have desires, rather than problems, to succeed in life or simply to get out of their job.

Step #2 – Offer them your solution

If you have completed Step #1 adequately, Step #2 is a piece of cake.

Now that you know their problems or desires, you should know if can offer your MLM business as a solution.

Let’s face it. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that your MLM business opportunity is the latest and greatest… or the be all, end all to all problems. It’s not.

Imagine your prospect told you that she is in the midst of a divorce. What would you do? Offer her your MLM business? Not me. I really don’t think she’s in the frame of mind to start a business.

On the other hand, if your prospect is looking for something to earn an extra income that would eventually replace his current income… and he is willing to learn and work hard, that would be a good fit for you to offer your MLM business as a solution.

The above concludes Part 2 of what makes a good MLM presentation. In Part 3, I’ll discuss what most network marketers missed out to follow through with their presentation to make a compelling close.